Archive for the ‘Paraguay’ Category

Chipa Recipe Easter tradition in Paraguay, Receta de Chipa para la Semana Santa

Yummy recipe sent to my by my friend Gilvi

Ingredientes: 700 grs. e almidón de madioca, 500 grs. de fecula de maiz (maizena), 500 grs. de queso paraguay, 500 grs. de manteca blanda, 6 huevos, 6 cucharadas de polvo de hornear, 3 cucharaditas de sal y 3 cucharaditas de anis (yo le puse 3 chucharadas de anis y salio espectacular)…

1. Batir la manteca en batidora mejor hasta que se convierta en crema y agregar de a uno los huevos, batiendo luego

2. Agregar al batido el queso paraguay bien desmenuzado y el anis estrujado (yo le agregue entero, que bruta, ja,ja,ja), mezclar.

3. Cernir todos los ingredientes secos (almidón, maizena, sal y polvo de hornear). Colocarlos en forma de corona sobre la mesada.

4. Colocar el batido en el centro de la corona, traer todo lo seco hacia el centro con las manos y hacer un arenado (quiere decir juntar con los dedos nomás). Luego unir la masa y agregar 2 o 3 cucharadas de leche si hace falta (yo le agregué). Tapar la masa y dejar descansar por 20 a 30 minutos.

5. Retirar un poco de masa, estirarla en forma de cordón de 4 a 5 cm de diametro, aplanarla ligeramente con la mano y cortar con cuchillo en forma de rombos.

6. Colocar en una placa enmantecada y llevar al horno precalentado a 200 o. durante 20 a 30 minutos hasta que los chipás estén ligeramente doradas.

Pd: no se endurece al día sgte.

Receta de Rocío Pangrazio, rociopangrazio@hotmail.com, publicado en la Revista Gastronomia.com, el 27 de marzo de 2010.

Share

Paraguay     No Comments »

Dating in Paraguay

I’ve noticed that even in Paraguay dating seems much harder than before, and I don’t know why in the entired world now dating or even meeting people in real life is so much difficult, modern times, perhaps?
I don’t know the answer for so many dating questions but I do know where paraguayans meet people online, I just found out about this dating website that seems to work, well at least for a couple of friends I have.
So, If you want to date in Paraguay, you should definetly check out this site :
www.club.com.py
and also another international latin website called: www.latinamaericancupid.com which connects people from other latin american countries.
For better of for worse, something must work to find the perfect date.

Share

Paraguay     No Comments »

Moving to Paraguay

Lately I’m getting a lot of emails from people wanting to move to Paraguay…people ask me a lot of interesting questions…and you get to know people better not by the answer they give but by the questions they make…

Here I will list the popular questions.

Cost of living?-Health/ medical care/ Quality/ insurance?-Schools? -Housing?-Best neighborhoods?-Moving around? Getting things done…level of easiness-Language?-How will people be accepted by locals? etc etc etc.

There are so many questions with no answer and so many answers with no questions…as every big decision it is a private decision where just the person involved in it can really know what feels better…I could and can answer most of the questions but…I would always suggest before moving to a country visit it first, have the feeling and specially stay with a local family or a vacation rental in a local house rather than a hotel, be with locals, deal with locals, shop and dine where locals do.

As a tourist you want to experiment different things, since you have just a short time you have to visit the landmarks and maybe party a bit and that is pretty much it…because it would be probably be the first and last one you visit Paraguay….but the thing is different if you consider to live there.

Here I will answer very briefly some of the questions above:

Cost of living for a family of 4 around 2000$ with a decent level, includes housing, decent private school, food, insurance some entertainment and gas.

Medical quality is good to excellent depending on where to go and what do you go in for, I had a good experience in that matter, Great and modern installations, great even for plastic surgery, I would recommend you go there instead of paying thousands of dollars here in the US, I always go to the dentist there and save thousands! If you consider to go for medical reasons contact me, I know my way around. Everything is a fraction of a price than here. At the embassy you can get a list of the best doctors and dentists in town.

Rent is around 500$for a nice small house in a decent neighborhood. (prices are getting up depending on the neighborhood)

Best private schools: American School, Christian Academy, San Ignacio de Loyola, Lumen, Goethe Schule, Dante Alighieri, Aleman Concordia, Cristo Rey, Las Teresas, Santa Clara, Las Almenas, San Patricio, Inter, La Providencia, Colegio de la Asuncion, Grace, Colegio del Sol, Sek just to mention a few.

Would strongly recommend to learn at least basic spanish!…

Well to keep it short for now…if you are tired of the rat race of other countries…Paraguay is a place you would seriously consider to move to.

Part II of this post coming soon…

Share

Paraguay     6 Comments »

Asuncion’s Map

I’m about to leaving, just few more days to go, Yay!!

A friend sent me this cool map, Check it out,  

Asuncion

Will start writing again once I arrive…well, not so soon I guess, have to catch up with friends and family, but as soon as I can I will, I promise! =-)

Share

Paraguay     No Comments »

Who pays?!

After spending almost 5 years here in the USA I have adquire some new habits and forgot some old ones which is normal with the passing of time…

I recall that the last time I went to Paraguay on vacation I was invited by a friend to a local pub (Britannia pub), he ordered a bunch of stuff (most of it we didn’t even eat) and some drinks, even though it was not expensive considering the amount of food he ordered I offered share the check with him.

He gave me a strange look, he was almost offended by my offer, and I couldn’t figure out what was wrong with my offer to split the check, then he said to me: We are not in the United States…then it all made sense to me, I remember that in the latin culture, men invite, even though if the actually don’t invite you they pretty much always pay the check for the ladies anyway.

Nowadays I could observe a little change of the situation, sometimes big parties split the bills but usually the men pay for the ladies in the party.

When I’m in Paraguay I let my friends pay for me (it’s a cultural thing)  but I often make sure and insist to treat them and I’m so glad when they happily accept my invitation =-)

Share

Paraguay     4 Comments »

Augusto Roa Bastos…special request

I just opened my email and got a challinging request from a blog reader…to comment about Yo el supremo by Augusto Roa Bastos.

So, here is the deal.

1- I’m going to ask a friend to send it to me (the last time i read it was in highschool) hopefully it arrives soon.

2- I’m going to read it and refresh my memory

3- Going to write a post with my comments, personal opinion and some photos that I will try to get from a friend who is a professional photographer and had the honor to photograph Roa Bastos not long before he died in april 2005.

Roa Bastos was a big writer, the biggest Paraguay had and probably will have

Here is some info from Wikipedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Augusto Roa Bastos, (June 13, 1917 – April 26, 2005), was a Paraguayan novelist, widely acclaimed as one of the greatest that nation has produced. He was best known for Yo el Supremo (1974; translated as “I, the Supreme”), one of the foremost Latin American novels to tackle the question of dictators and dictatorships, in the person of José Gaspar Rodríguez de Francia, who ruled Paraguay with an iron fist and no little eccentricity for 26 years in the early 19th century. His other major work was Hijo de Hombre (1960; “Son of Man”); he also wrote numerous other novels and stories.

He was born and spent his childhood in Iturbe, a small town some 200 km to the south of Asunción, the capital, where his father worked as an estate manager. In 1932, with the outbreak of the Chaco War, he dropped out of school and joined the troops as a medical auxiliary; the horrors he experienced during this time set him firmly against violence for the rest of his life. After the war, his first jobs were as a bank clerk and reporter on the Asunción daily El País; around the same time, he also began writing for the theatre. During World War II he was invited to London by the British Council; he also served as the El País war correspondent in London and covered the Nuremberg Trials for that paper.

In 1947, because of his activities in opposition to President Higinio Morínigo during the Paraguayan Civil War, he was forced to flee the country. He settled in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where he published most of his work. With the arrival of the military dictatorship in 1976, however, he left Argentina for France, where he taught Guarani and Spanish literature at the University of Toulouse. He did not return to his native Paraguay until 1989, following the downfall of Alfredo Stroessner. That same year, he was awarded the Premio Cervantes (Cervantes Prize), awarded by the Spanish Royal Academy and its correspondent academies in the various American nations, in recognition of outstanding contributions to the Spanish-language novel; he spent the prize money on educational and literary projects in Paraguay.


[edit] Bibliography

  • 1942 – El ruiseñor de la aurora, y otros poemas
  • 1947-1949 – El naranjal ardiente, nocturno paraguayo
  • 1950 – El fiscal
  • 1960 – Hijo de hombre (“Son of Man”)
  • 1974 – Yo el Supremo (“I, the Supreme”)
  • 1979 – Lucha hasta el alba
  • 1992 – Vigilia del Almirante
  • 1996 – Madama Sui
  • 1953 – El trueno entre las hojas
  • 1967 – Los pies sobre el agua
  • 1969 – Moriencia
  • 1972 – Cuerpo presente, y otros textos
  • 1974 – El pollito de fuego
  • 1974 – Los Congresos
  • 1976 – El somnámbulo
  • 1979 – Los Juegos
  • 1980 – Antología personal
  • 1984 – Contar un cuento, y otros relatos
  • 1989 – On Modern Latin American Fiction
  • 1996 – Metaforismos
Share

Paraguay     No Comments »

Moving or Visiting Paraguay?

Paraguay

I’m getting a lot of emails from people going to move to Paraguay or going to live there for a while, or retiring there (which I think it’s a very good option) or people that are going to study there o just visiting there for a short time. I thank all of you that keep reading my blog, and hopefully enjoying it =)

When people ask me if they are going to like Paraguay I always answer that there are 2 kind of people, the ones who will love it and the ones that will hate it, and maybe a 3rd category of people, the kind of people that will go to Paraguay to observe, to learn, to catch a mental image, to notice the unnoticeable, to believe the unbelievable, to look for the experience of enjoying the unthinkable and maybe to see beauty where there are just abandonment left.

I came up with some questions and answer about what people that are going to Paraguay need to know, not the why or the

Do I need a visa (not referring to credit card) to enter Paraguay? : If you are US citizen you will need a visa, maybe you want to get one from Brazil too, because while there its a must to visit Brazil, If you are Mercosur or European citizen, you don’t need visa, and for other countries, please contact your nearest consulate.

What is the usual first impression upon arrival in Asuncion? The first impact every time i arrive is the humidity, the air, is so much different, summer time is very hot and humid, in the airport in costumes sometimes they are corrupt and in other words they may ask you for some money to let pass your stuff, always in a nice way, but just give what you think is fair, that obviously gives Paraguay a bad image. The airport size is relatively small, and unfortunately Paraguay doesn’t not own a airline, sadly true.

Where to stay upon arrival: There are so many places to choose, on the utopist, on the way from airport to city there is a Sheraton Hotel ( that is not my choice, but is a nice place to stay, very good located). Please see my hotel list for more info from past posts or click here

Hotels

Where can i rent a car? Yes, you can rent a car even at the airport, it’s not as cheap as you might think but it’s a good option to get around, please read my post about driving in Paraguay, driving there is a chaos and you will have to get used to it and develop some skills. Some are: National Car Rental, Hertz at the Airport (+595 21 605708), Fast Rent a Car (+595 21 60 54 26), Inter Locadora (+595 21 66 02 17)

Can I get around public transportation? Yes, not very clean but it works for a big part of us, taxi’s are very cheap and is a good way to get around. Radio taxi (+ 595 21 311 080)

Is there a tourism information center in Asuncion: Actually yes, it is in downtown Asuncion, Direction General del Turismo, address: Palma y Alberdi. (more…)

Share

Paraguay     5 Comments »

The train is back. Ride from Asuncion to Aregua on Sundays.

Aregua view

In the past traveling by train were among the traveling options in Paraguay, well, that’s part of history now, but the good news is that from now on, there is a trip from Asuncion to Aregua we all can enjoy on Sunday’s, starting this Sunday.

It’s a great way to spend the whole day with your family

The “tren del Lago” (Expreso Tata Piriri), leaves from the Botanical Garden Station (Asuncion) on Sunday’s at 10am to Aregua (a very beautiful city on Ypacarai Lake), and comes back to Asuncion at 16.30, the price for the tour is 20$ a person.

The nice thing about the trip is that a play goes on inside the train, with actors representing old time travelers. It’s also interesting how they interact with passenger..

There is also soda and typical Paraguayan food that you can buy on the train.

I never had the chance to ride on that train yet but next time I go to Paraguay I will try it, it seems to be great experience.

I’m pretty sure I will love the trip, the play, the food, the environment, the people and the view (I will make sure to take some friends and my camera with me)

Share

Paraguay     No Comments »

Paraguay customs sUcK!!!!!

I’m pretty sad and pissed today, my brother who lives in Paraguay just let me know that the package I sent to Paraguay was violated at customs (in Asuncion) and they robbed a lot of jewelry I was sending to Paraguay.

I lost a lot of money but what actually hurts its not only that, is the feeling of insecurity, violation against private property and the big frustration caused by this situation because its not the first time I sent things over there and my package arrived with less than half of the items.

These people like are rats, corrupt and they just don’t care about anything…the worse is that no one “knows anything“, all are innocent, they tell the biggest lies when you confront them, they say things like: you package was probably open in another country! come on! we all know that they were the ones who opened and stole things of my package, and I’m sure that there are a lot of people out there with the same problems.

One bizarre thing is when you try to claim the insurance of the postal company they tell you that is impossible because the insurance just pays if you don’t get the package at all or if the package get lost somehow and you never get it, but they don’t pay if someone violates your package and you get just a fraction of what suppose to get.

That is one of the things I hate about my country, some people in public administration are ignorant, dishonest, and have no scruples and this image gives Paraguay a bad reputation.

I bet they can still sleep peacefully to get up fresh in the morning and get another victim.

Beware before sending values to Paraguay, you will be lucky if they arrive partially.

Share

Paraguay     4 Comments »

Presidente Hayes.

Thanks to: John A. Fatherley for this nice contribution to my blog. Gracias Juan!

It is very nice what you are doing to interest people in Paraguay. Paraguay is a very interesting country, but it has a ‘bad reputation’ because of certain things that have happened there is the past. One of the good things that not very many people know about is the legacy of U. S. President Rutherford B. Hayes (1878-81) who arbitrated a boundary dispute between Argentina and Paraguay after the terrible Triple Alliance War (1865-1870). He found in favor of Paraguay and is a national hero, of sorts, there.

November 12th is a holiday every year in the Department of Presidente Hayes, and there is a lot of celebration about this in Villa Hayes in the Chaco. I am going there in November 2007, and would like anyone interested in this celebration to go with me. November is ‘not too bad’ in Paraguay as far as the heat is concerned. I hope that anyone interested in this idea will contact you. Thank you again for your work in ‘bringing Paraguay out of the Latin American closet’.  John A.

Share

Paraguay     No Comments »